About

See our most recent portfolio at truittfoug.com

Process

The balancing act for this office is between respectful study and assertive invention. Truitt Foug Architects approaches the design of new buildings with an awareness of past insights into program and form. This precedent study is accompanied by a thorough analysis of the client’s needs, which leads to ideas for material and spatial expression. Constraints from the client, the site, and the city are welcomed and seen as a structure to build on.

Formally, we look to assembly rather than narrative as a source for depth in design. Instead of telling a story through decoration, we attempt to gently surprise the visitor by forcefully framing space and, where possible, revealing the intricacies of construction. In school projects, especially, it is important to create meaningful details – young students should be given the chance to come across rich moments in the building that explain the structure of their environment. Resolving competing geometries and joining disparate materials can yield such opportunities.

Urban Analysis

When placing a project in context, we study the city carefully in order to make appropriate interventions that support the way neighborhoods are used. Our proposed projects aim to organize existing activity rather than impose new forms and uses in an idealized manner.

Sorting Through Existing Conditions

We employ the same respectful yet critical attitude when approaching renovation and addition projects. We think of these projects as “rebuilds,” since, in a given project, we aim to draw out the inherent strengths of the building and articulate and emphasize those strengths more clearly than in the original construction. See our “Rebuild and Add” page for an example.

Principals

William Truitt is an associate professor at University of Houston’s Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, where he also coordinates fourth and fifth year professional studios. He leads studio trips abroad to conduct research on the spatial expression of intense urban conditions, most recently in Vietnam and Cambodia. He holds a Bachelor of Environmental Design from Texas A&M University and a Master of Architecture from Syracuse University. He has worked for Gluckman Mayner Architects, Polshek & Partners, and Garrison Architects in New York, as well as Morris Architects in Houston. While at Morris, he designed three projects that earned Houston AIA honor awards. He is a registered architect in Texas.

Carolyn Foug holds a Bachelor of Arts from Brown University and a Master of Architecture from Yale University. She has worked for Dillon Kyle Architecture and Curtis & Windham Architects in Houston, and Gluckman Mayner Architects and Robert A.M. Stern Architects in New York. While practicing in New York, she edited an issue of Perspecta, The Yale Architectural Journal.  She is a registered architect in Texas.

Contact Information

Carolyn Foug
William Truitt

Truitt Foug Architects
1602 Hawthorne St
Houston TX 77006

713.520.9958 – t
713.520.8723 – f

truittfoug@gmail.com

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One thought on “About

  1. Hello Carolyn and William,

    As left on your cell phone voicemail, I am an architectural lighting consultant from Los Angeles and I am very impressed by your project work and design philosophy. I am in town for a couple more days before heading back and had hoped to meet and talk with you briefly. I hope we can discuss any lighting, daylighting, or even solar strategies that we can support you with.

    Following is our company website and I hope you will take a look. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

    Le Nguyen
    Francis Krahe & Associates
    http://www.fkaild.com
    cell 714.225.1791

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